Exhibitions

Treasures and Talismans: Rings from the Griffin Collection at The Cloisters Museum & Gardens

Treasures and Talismans: Rings from the Griffin Collection at The Cloisters Museum & Gardens

Worn by women and men, finger rings are among the oldest and most familiar forms of jewelry. In addition to their use as personal adornments, rings can serve as declarations of status, markers of significant life events, expressions of identity, and protective talismans. Some three dozen ancient, medieval, and later examples are shown in the exhibition Treasures and Talismans: Rings from the Griffin Collection, that opened May 1 at The Cloisters—a branch of The Metropolitan Museum of Art devoted to the art and architecture of the Middle Ages. The collection is named after the mythical creature that was part lion and part eagle. In medieval lore, the griffin was often a guardian of treasure and was known for seeking out gold in rocks—hence its fitting use for this private collection of precious gold rings. 

http://www.metmuseum.org/about-the-museum/press-room/exhibitions/2015/treasures-and-talismans