UPCOMING ICMA DEADLINES - CALL FOR PROPOSALS AND PAPERS

COLLEGE ART ASSOCIATION - NEW INFORMATION!
Call for ICMA-sponsored session proposals
15-18 February 2017 (due 15 August 2015)

LEEDS INTERNATIONAL MEDIEVAL CONGRESS
 Call for Papers: Setting the Table: Medieval Tablescapes, Dining, and the Visual Culture of Food
ICMA Student Committee
4-7 July 2016 (due 25 August 2015) DEADLINE EXTENDED TO SEPTEMBER 17th

LEEDS INTERNATIONAL MEDIEVAL CONGRESS
Call for ICMA-sponsored session proposals
4-7 July 2016 (due 10 September 2015)

INTERNATIONAL CONGRESS ON MEDIEVAL STUDIES AT KALAMAZOO
Call for papers: Crossing the Hanseatic Threshold and Beyond: Making Connections in Medieval Art, c. 1200-1500
ICMA Student Committee
12-15 May 2016 (due 15 September 2015)

INTERNATIONAL CONGRESS ON MEDIEVAL STUDIES AT KALAMAZOO
Call for papers: Models and Copies, Masters and Pupils: New Work on Spanish Illuminated Manuscripts in Honor of John Williams (1928-2015),
12-15 May 2016 (due 15 September 2015)

INTERNATIONAL CONGRESS ON MEDIEVAL STUDIES AT KALAMAZOO
Picturing the Present: Structuring the Medieval Beholder’s Relation towards Time
12-15 May 2016 (due 15 September 2015)

A NOTE ABOUT KRESS TRAVEL AWARDS

ICMA AT COLLEGE ART ASSOCIATION, New York, 15-18 February 2017     
 
CALL FOR PROPOSALS
The International Center of Medieval Art (ICMA) seeks proposals for sessions to be held under the organization’s sponsorship at the annual meeting of the College Art Association in New York City in 2017. Session organizers and speakers must be ICMA members. Proposals must include a session abstract, a CV of the organizer(s), and a list of speakers, all in one single Doc or PDF with the organizer’s name in the title.

Please note: new CAA regulations require all participants be CAA members. 

Please direct all session proposals and inquiries by 15 August 2015 to the Chair of the ICMA Programs and Lectures Committee:  Janis Elliott, Texas Tech University. Email: janis.elliott@ttu.edu .
 


ICMA AT LEEDS INTERNATIONAL MEDIEVAL CONGRESS, 4-7 July 2016

CALL FOR PAPERS
Setting the Table: Medieval Tablescapes, Dining, and the Visual Culture of Food
 
Sponsor: International Center of Medieval Art Student Committee
Organizer: Meg Bernstein, U.C.L.A.
 
In connection with the broad theme of Leeds, “Food, Feast & Famine,” the Student Committee of the International Center for Medieval Art (ICMA) seeks proposals for 15-20 minute papers that examine the roles of food, dining, and production in the visual culture of all periods and geographies of the Middle Ages. Food is a thread that links together religious and secular, elites and peasants, and is a theme that welcomes papers on the humblest as well as the most lavish objects and buildings. 
 
Possible topics include but are not limited to: depictions of food, feasting, or food preparation in sculpture, manuscripts, or other media; the Eucharist as food; representations of food and hospitality for travellers or pilgrims; the automatons, textiles, metalworks, and other objects that were used in feast or banquet settings; the architecture of feasting or food-preparation spaces; the depiction of patron saints of food-producing guilds (e.g. winemakers), and even representations of abstinence from food. 
  
The Student Committee of the International Center of Medieval Art involves and advocates for all members with student status. As a committee that addresses the concerns of students, we see this session as a forum for discussion and informal mentorship within our field. 
 
To propose a paper, please send an abstract and C.V. to Meg Bernstein (megbernstein@ucla.edu). Proposals should be emailed no later than August 25th, 2015
 


ICMA AT LEEDS INTERNATIONAL MEDIEVAL CONGRESS, 4-7 July 2016
 
CALL FOR PROPOSALS
The International Center of Medieval Art (ICMA) seeks proposals for sessions to be held under the organization’s sponsorship at the International Medieval Congress (IMC) in Leeds, England, in 2016.  Session organizers and speakers must be ICMA members. Proposals must include a session abstract, a CV of the organizer(s), and a list of speakers, all in one single Doc or PDF with the organizer’s name in the title.

Please direct all session proposals and inquiries by 10 September 2015 to the Chair of the ICMA Programs and Lectures Committee: Janis Elliott, Texas Tech University. Email: janis.elliott@ttu.edu .
 


ICMA AT INTERNATIONAL CONGRESS ON MEDIEVAL STUDIES, Kalamazoo, 12-15 May 2016

CALL FOR PAPERS
Crossing the Hanseatic Threshold and Beyond: Making Connections in Medieval Art, c. 1200-1500
 
Sponsor: International Center of Medieval Art Student Committee
Organizers: Lehti Mairike Keelmann, University of Michigan, and Laura Tillery, University of Pennsylvania
 
The Hanse, also known as the Hanseatic League, was a trade network of merchants and cities across the Northern and Baltic Seas that flourished in the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries. Due to its geographic reach, the Hanse provided a framework to connect distant towns, peoples, cultures, ideas, and materials together. This session aims to explore the often-overlooked artistic production in the transnational Hanseatic region. Artistic exchange across Hanse trade routes was extensive and wide reaching. Art objects traveled long distances and were produced with great variety to reflect the multi-faceted identities and goals of their patrons.
 
For this session, we invite papers that address artistic circulation, mobility, exchange, networks, identity, media, and/or patronage in the Hanseatic arena. We welcome both specific case studies as well as papers that interrogate larger questions on ‘Hanseatic art’, Hanse art historical historiography, and the self-fashioning of Hanse merchants or patrons. Along these lines, papers could also explore artistic links between the Hanse and other trade networks or more generally, art and mercantile trade in littoral and riverine towns in Europe, c. 1200-1500.
 
The Student Committee of the International Center of Medieval Art involves and advocates for all members with student status. As a committee that addresses the concerns of students, we see this session as a forum for discussion and informal mentorship within our field.
 
To propose a paper, please send an abstract, C.V., and a completed Congress Participant Information Form, available on the Congress website to Lehti Mairike Keelmann (lehtik@umich.edu) and Laura Tillery (tillery@sas.upenn.edu). 

Proposals should be emailed no later than September 15th, 2015.  
  
ICMA AT INTERNATIONAL CONGRESS ON MEDIEVAL STUDIES, Kalamazoo, 12-15 May 2016

CALL FOR PAPERS
Models and Copies, Masters and Pupils: New Work on Spanish Illuminated Manuscripts in Honor of John Williams (1928-2015),

Organized by David Raizman, Therese Martin, and Julie A. Harris
 
In the colophon to the 960 Bible from León, the scribe Florentius, dressed in clerical garb, raises a bubbling toast to his “most cherished pupil, chosen by me.” The illuminator Sanctius responds in kind to his “Master,” lifting his cup and joining in praise to Christ for their completion of this magnificent book. On folio 12 of the same manuscript, however, in a grand display filling the entire page, it is Sanctius alone who asks the reader to remember him for his individual efforts. The two figures on the bible’s omega page thus serve as a metaphor for this session, which centers on copies that depart from their models and pupils who do not always tread directly in the footsteps of their masters. Our point of departure is the inimitable work of John Williams in the field of illuminated manuscripts, particularly the Beatus Commentaries on the Apocalypse, which has inspired scholars beyond the bounds of Spanish medieval studies.

For this session we seek submissions from junior or senior scholars who have questioned traditionally-held assumptions of art historical scholarship, particularly concerning illuminations that do not consistently copy their models. We are interested in the choice to deviate from an archetype, especially the ways in which such decisions give rise to provocative new questions about intentionality and audience, likeness and divergence, and scholarly innovations that lead to paradigm shifts.
 
Please send a 200-word abstracttwo-page CV, and completed ICMS Participant Information Form (http://wmich.edu/medieval/files/medieval-pif-2016.pdf) in asingle PDF file with your name in the title by 15 September 2015 to:
Julie A. Harris (Spertus Institute for Jewish Studies, marfiles@comcast.net)
Therese Martin (CSIC, Madrid, therese.martin@cchs.csic.es)
David Raizman (Drexel University, raizmand@drexel.edu)
 
For further information please contact the Chair of the ICMA Programs Committee, Janis Elliott (Texas Tech University, janis.elliott@ttu.edu).

Membership in ICMA (http://www.medievalart.org/) is required of all speakers in this sponsored session. Submissions that are not selected will be forwarded to the Medieval Institute to be considered for inclusion in the general sessions.
 
ICMA AT INTERNATIONAL CONGRESS ON MEDIEVAL STUDIES, Kalamazoo, 12-15 May 2016

Picturing the Present: Structuring the Medieval Beholder’s Relation towards Time

Organized by Armin Bergmeier and Andrew Griebeler
 
“What then is time?” asks Augustine, the fourth-century bishop of Hippo, “If no one asks me, I know, but if I wish to explain it, I do not know.” Although intimately familiar, time eludes simple description. For Augustine, it is a single, ever-moving point of the present that pushes forward in anticipation of things to come, and pulls backwards in memory and recollection. The centuries following Augustine saw the continued emergence of Christian and medieval approaches to time alongside the concurrent appropriation and adaptation of older pagan models, such as Neoplatonic conceptions of time as a moving image of eternity, or Aristotelian understandings of time according to the change and movement of bodies. This panel, emphasizes and explores the medieval viewers’ relationship to the present and their current place in the cosmological system.

We invite proposals covering a wide range of media (portable objects, manuscripts, sculpture, wall decorations) from late antiquity through the late Middle Ages, possibly including but not limited to the following: How images relate to the conceptualization of the historical present; How artworks structure or organize the experience of time; How artworks reflect philosophical concepts of the nature of time; Medieval conceptions of change in the physical or natural historical present, including seasons, tides, stages of life, and the movement of stars.
 
Please send a 200-word abstracttwo-page CV, and completed ICMS Participant Information Form (http://wmich.edu/medieval/files/medieval-pif-2016.pdf) in asingle PDF file with your name in the title by 15 September to:
Armin Bergmeier   (armin.bergmeier@gmail.com)
Andrew Griebeler(agriebeler@berkeley.edu)
 
For further information please contact the Chair of the ICMA Programs Committee, Janis Elliott (Texas Tech University, janis.elliott@ttu.edu).

Membership in ICMA (http://www.medievalart.org/) is required of all speakers in this sponsored session. Submissions that are not selected will be forwarded to the Medieval Institute to be considered for inclusion in the general sessions.
 
A NOTE ABOUT KRESS TRAVEL AWARDS
Thanks to a generous grant from the Kress Foundation, funds may be available to defray travel costs of speakers in ICMA-sponsored sessions up to a maximum of $600 for domestic travel and of $1200 for international travel. If available, the Kress funds are allocated for travel and hotel only. Speakers in ICMA sponsored sessions will be refunded only after the conference, against travel receipts.  In addition to speakers, session organizers delivering papers as an integral part of the session (i.e. with a specific title listed in the program) are now also eligible to receive travel funding.  
Go to: http://www.medievalart.org/kress-travel-grant/ .

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