National Endowment of Humanities - Humanities Collections and Reference Resources Grants: due 16 July 2019

The Division of Preservation and Access of the National Endowment for the Humanities is accepting applications for grants in its Humanities Collections and Reference Resources program, with a deadline of July 16, 2019. These grants support projects to preserve and create intellectual access to such collections as rare books, journals, manuscript and archival materials, maps, still and moving images, sound recordings, art, and objects of material culture. Awards also support the creation of reference works, online resources, and research tools of major importance to the humanities. Eligible activities are wide-ranging; many involve the use of digital methods. Further details, including links to the application guidelines and other resources, are available at: www.neh.gov/grants/preservation/humanities-collections-and-reference-resources.

CFP: Women and Gender in Italian Trecento Art and Architecture, Italian Art Society sponsored session at RSA; due 8 July 2019

Call for Papers for Italian Art Society (IAS) sponsored session at RSA, 2-4 April 2020, Philadelphia:

Session Title: Women and Gender in Italian Trecento Art and Architecture

Session Chair: Judith Steinhoff, University of Houston

This session examines both the patronage and the representation of women in 13th- and 14th-century Italian art, topics that remain under-explored despite the large body of scholarship on women and gender in other cultures and periods. Proposals are especially welcome that go beyond the stereotypical gender identities and roles promoted by the Church and theological writings, to seek a complex understanding of the models for and the lives of Trecento women.

Please send proposals to the organizer, Judith Steinhoff (jsteinho@Central.UH.EDU OR jsteinhoff@uh.edu), by Monday, July 8, 2019.

Paper proposals must include:
• abstract (150 words max)
• paper title (25 words max)
• your full name, current affiliation, email address, and Ph.D. completion date (past or expected)
• a brief c.v. (300 words max, and must be in list not narrative form)
• a list of key words (8 max)

**Please note: Speakers must become RSA members by November 1st to speak at the conference. As this is a sponsored panel, all speakers must also be (or become) members of the Italian Art Society.

International symposium 'The Saint Enshrined: European Tabernacle-altarpiece (c.1150-1400)' (Valladolid, 7-8 June 2019): REGISTRATION NOW OPEN

International symposium 'The Saint Enshrined: European Tabernacle-altarpiece (c.1150-1400)' (Valladolid, 7-8 June 2019): REGISTRATION NOW OPEN

Deadline 31 May 2019

Registration is now open for those wishing to attend the International Symposium 'The Saint Enshrined: European Tabernacle-Altarpieces c.1150-1400', to be held in Valladolid the 7-8 June 2019. Registration is free, but mandatory, as places are strictly limited to 38. Those willing to register should email Prof. Irune Fiz at irunefiz@fyl.uva.es. The full programme of the symposium, which includes a field trip to the diocese of Vitoria, is to be found in the link below (information in Spanish, including a link to the diptych, which is in English, the main language of the event).

http://historiadelarte.uva.es/2019/04/inscripcion-simposio-internacional-the-saint-enshrined/

East of Byzantium Lecture and Workshop, 11-12 April 2019; registration closes 9 April 2019

East of Byzantium Lecture and Workshop
April 11 & 12, 2019

The Arthur H. Dadian and Ara Oztemel Chair of Armenian Art at Tufts University and the Mary Jaharis Center for Byzantine Art and Culture at Hellenic College Holy Cross in Brookline, MA, are pleased to announce the final East of Byzantium events for 2018–2019.

Thursday, April 11, 2019, 6:15–7:45 pm
Harvard Faculty Club, 20 Quincy Street, Cambridge, MA

Armenian Merchant Patronage of Early Modern Iran
A lecture by Amy Landau, Freer|Sackler, Smithsonian Institution, discussing the patronage of New Julfa’s Armenian merchant community.

Friday, April 12, 2019, 10:00 am–12:00 pm
Harvard Faculty Club, 20 Quincy Street, Cambridge, MA

Image-making and Anxiety among New Julfa’s Armenian Artists, Theologians & Merchants
A workshop for students exploring how Armenian artists, theologians, merchants, among others, thought about images and image-making in early modern Iran. Led by Amy Landau, Freer|Sackler, Smithsonian Institution.

Advance registration required. Registration closes April 9. Additional information and registration at https://eastofbyzantium.org/upcoming-events/image-making-and-anxiety/

East of Byzantium is a partnership between the Arthur H. Dadian and Ara Oztemel Chair of Armenian Art at Tufts University and the Mary Jaharis Center for Byzantine Art and Culture at Hellenic College Holy Cross in Brookline, MA, that explores the cultures of the eastern frontier of the Byzantine empire in the late antique and medieval periods.

For questions, contact Brandie Ratliff, Director, Mary Jaharis Center for Byzantine Art and Culture (mjcbac@hchc.edu).

http://eastofbyzantium.org/upcoming-events/

CFP, 31 March 2019: Medievalist Toolkit Meeting: a workshop for public scholarship countering far-right misinformation

CALL FOR PARTICIPANTS

Medievalist Toolkit Meeting: a workshop for public scholarship countering far-right misinformation

May 4, 2019 at Columbia University

Submission deadline: March 31, 2019

Send abstracts and questions to: medievalisttoolkit@gmail.com

The Medievalist Toolkit is an initiative run by graduate students that addresses far-right misappropriations of the Middle Ages. To do so, we research extremist narratives, develop short responses to combat them, and solicit input from journalists and nonprofit professionals so that our research will be easily accessible for their work against the far-right. These responses will eventually be shared online with support from Columbia's Medieval & Renaissance Studies Program and History in Action , funded by the American Historical Association and Mellon Foundation.

The toolkit has two goals: to be a resource for professionals working in journalism and nonprofit organizations who encounter far-right talking points related to the Middle Ages, and to teach graduate students how to produce public scholarship in consultation with these professionals.

We invite graduate students to join us by (1) identifying a far-right talking point involving a medieval topic, and (2) writing a short response to address and dismantle it (approximately 1,000-1,500 words).

Participants will be invited to present their findings in a workshop at Columbia on May 4, in conversation with experts such as Sammy Rangel , the Executive Director of Life After Hate, and journalist Vegas Tenold , author of Everything You Love Will Burn: Inside the Rebirth of White Nationalism in America .

If you are interested in participating, please send the topic of your choice to medievalisttoolkit@gmail.com along with a brief abstract outlining your response.

Suggested topics include, but are not limited to:
– the myth and presumed superiority of a white/Christian Middle Ages
- the history of anti-Semitism
– the Crusades
– women’s agency and rights in the Middle Ages
– the misappropriation of popular symbols: the Knights Templar, Holy Roman Empire, etc.
– modern regimes and their fascinations with the medieval
– caliphal claims among modern extremist groups
– profiling a far-right spokesperson and dismantling their talking points

Register today for "Eclecticism at the Edges: Medieval Art and Architecture at the Crossroads of the Latin, Greek and Slavic Cultural Spheres"

The ICMA is co-sponsoring the Symposium “Eclecticism at the Edges: Medieval Art and Architecture at the Crossroads of the Latin, Greek and Slavic Cultural Spheres.” The Symposium will be held on April 5-6, 2019 at Princeton University.

This event is free, but registration is required to guarantee seating. Please register here.

For any queries, please contact the organizers at eclecticism.symposium@gmail.com.

SYMPOSIUM

Eclecticism at the Edges: Medieval Art and Architecture at the Crossroads of the Latin, Greek, and Slavic Cultural Spheres (c.1300-c.1550)

 

April 5-6, 2019
Princeton University

 

Organizers:

M. Alessia Rossi, The Index of Medieval Art

Alice Isabella Sullivan, University of Michigan

eclecticism.symposium@gmail.com

 

This event is generously co-sponsored by the following:

The International Center of Medieval Art
The Society of Historians of East European, Eurasian, and Russian Art and Architecture
The Mary Jaharis Center for Byzantine Art and Culture
The Princeton Institute for International and Regional Studies
The Department of Art & Archaeology, Princeton University
The Index of Medieval Art, Princeton University
The Seeger Center for Hellenic Studies with the support of the Stanley J. Seeger Hellenic Fund

 

 

Friday, April 5, 2019 

5:00       M. Alessia Rossi, The Index of Medieval Art

              Alice Isabella Sullivan, University of Michigan

              Welcome

 

5:15      Keynote Lecture

             Jelena Erdeljan, University of Belgrade

             Cross-Cultural Entanglement and Visual Culture in Eastern Europe                 c. 1300-1550

 

6:30      Film Screening and Exhibition

             Introduction by Julia Gearhart, Princeton University

            "No Woman’s Land”: A 1929 Expedition to Mount Athos and Meteora

 

7:30      Reception, McCormick Hall

 

 

Saturday, April 6, 2019

9:00      Session 1 - New Constructs of Identity

 Chair: Charlie Barber, Princeton University

 

 Elena Boeck, DePaul University

 A Timeless Ideal: Constantinople in the Slavonic Imagination of the                14th-16th Centuries

Gianvito Campobasso, University of Fribourg

Eclecticism Among Multiple Identities: The Visual Culture of Albania               in the Late Middle Ages

 Ida Sinkević, Lafayette College

 Serbian Royal Mausolea: A Reflection of Cultural Identity?

           

10:40    Coffee / Tea Break

 

11:00    Session 2 - Shifting Iconographies

             Chair: Pamela Patton, The Index of Medieval Art

 

 Vlad Bedros, National University of Arts, Bucharest

   A Hybrid Iconography: The Lamb of God in Moldavian Wall-       Paintings

 Krisztina Ilko, The Metropolitan Museum of Art

 The Dormition of the Virgin: Artistic Exchange and Innovation in   Medieval Wall Paintings from Slovakia

 Ovidiu Olar, Austrian Academy of Sciences

  A Murderer among the Seraphim: Prince Lăpușneanu’s     Transfiguration Embroideries for Slatina Monastery

 

12:40     Lunch Break

 

2:00        Session 3 - Patronage and Agents of Exchange

   Chair: Cristina Stancioiu, College of William and Mary

 

   Dragoş Gh. Năstăsoiu, Centre for Medieval Studies, National                     Research University “Higher School of Economics,” Moscow

   Appropriation, Adaptation, and Transformation: Painters of                             Byzantine Tradition Working for Catholic Patrons in 14th- and 

   15th- century Transylvania

   Christos Stavrakos, University of Ioannina/Greece

   Donors, Patrons, and Benefactors in Mediaeval Epirus between the 

   Great Empires: A Society in Change or a Continuity?

   Nazar Kozak, National Academy of Sciences of UkrainePost-    

   Byzantine Art as a Network: Mobility Trajectories of the Akathistos     Cycle in the Balkans, the Carpathians, and Beyond

 

3:40       Coffee / Tea Break

 

4:00       Keynote Lecture

              Michalis Olympios, University of Cyprus

             “Eclecticism,” “Hybridity,” and “Transculturality” in Late 

               Medieval Art: A View from the Eastern Mediterranean

 

5:15        Roundtable Discussion, Questions, and Closing

               Moderator and Respondent: Ivan Stevović, University of Belgrade

 

6:00        Final Reception, Chancellor Green Rotunda

Dumbarton Oaks Byzantine Studies Symposium: Processions: Urban Ritual in Byzantium and Neighboring Lands, April 12  –  13, 2019

Processions: Urban Ritual in Byzantium and Neighboring Lands
Byzantine Studies Symposium
Leslie Brubaker and Nancy Ševčenko, Symposiarchs

Dumbarton Oaks Music Room
April 12  –  13, 2019

Register here.

Military, civic, and religious processions were hallmarks of the ancient and medieval world; they continued into the Renaissance and, indeed, continue to this day. The Byzantine procession has not yet been subjected to any synthetic, historicizing, contextualizing, or comparative examination.

Understanding processions is critical for our appreciation of how urban space worked and was manipulated in the Middle Ages. For the 2019 Dumbarton Oaks Byzantine Symposium, speakers will examine texts, artifacts, and images to develop a new understanding of medieval urban life across multiple social registers. For example, records of processions show us what kinds of public behavior were acceptable, and when, and where. Studying processions introduces us to new protagonists as well, for processions involve audiences as well as participants, and groups hitherto virtually invisible, such as the team of people who prepared for the event by decorating the streets, will be brought to light. The Byzantine commitment to processions is striking in terms of the resources and time allocated: there were as many as two processions a week in Constantinople, many involving the patriarch and the emperor. In the Latin West, the Crusader States, and in the Fatimid, Ottoman, and Muscovite worlds, by comparison, processions occurred far less frequently: the procession was significantly more important to the Byzantines than to their neighbors and successors. The comparative study of Byzantine processions to be offered by the speakers at the symposium will reveal how the Byzantines operated in a complex global network defined by local contexts, how the Byzantines positioned themselves within this network, and the nature of the Byzantine legacy to the Islamic, Catholic, and Orthodox inheritors of their culture.

Bliss Symposium Awards for students (deadline: March 1, 2019)

Speakers

  • Nathanael Andrade (Binghamton University – SUNY), “Controlling Material and Semiotic Landscapes: Processions in Late Antiquity”

  • Christine Angelidi (Institute of Historical Research, National Hellenic Research Foundation), “Sparkling Creations, Threads of Tradition: Marian Processions in Medieval Constantinople”

  • Leslie Brubaker (University of Birmingham), “Bridging the Gap: Processions in Early Medieval Constantinople”

  • Michael Featherstone (Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique; University of Fribourg), “Middle Byzantine Public Processions in Constantinople”

  • Michael S. Flier (Harvard University), “Changing Times, Divergent Destinies: Processional Imagery in the Age of the Tsar”

  • Georgia Frank (Colgate University), “The Things They Carried: Religious Processions in Early Byzantium”

  • Niels Gaul (University of Edinburgh), “Processions in the Late Byzantine World”

  • Çiğdem Kafescioğlu (Boğaziçi University), “Guild Processions in Istanbul: Claiming Public Space in the Early Modern City”

  • James Norrie (University of Oxford), “Eleventh- and Twelfth-Century Processions in Milan and Rome: Urban Conflict or Civic Integration?”

  • Sebastian Salvadó (Independent scholar), “The Latin Processions in Jerusalem”

  • Paula Sanders (Rice University), “Negotiating power in the Islamic Mediterranean: Urban Processions in Egypt, North Africa, and Iberia”

  • Alexandra Vukovich (University of Oxford), “Princely Processions and Peregrinations: Itinerant Rulership in Early Rus”

East of Byzantium Workshop, A Medieval Armenian Text in its Eurasian Context, register by 26 March

The Arthur H. Dadian and Ara Oztemel Chair of Armenian Art at Tufts University and the Mary Jaharis Center for Byzantine Art and Culture at Hellenic College Holy Cross in Brookline, MA, are pleased to announce our next East of Byzantium workshop.

Friday, March 29, 2019, 10:00 am–1:00 pm
Harvard Faculty Club, 20 Quincy Street, Cambridge, MA


A Medieval Armenian Text in its Eurasian Context
A workshop for students focusing on a history of the Islamic conquest and rule of Armenia by the 8th-century Armenian priest Łewond. Led by Sergio La Porta, Fresno State, and Alison M. Vacca, University of Tennessee, Knoxville

Advance registration required. Registration closes March 26.
East of Byzantium is a partnership between the Arthur H. Dadian and Ara Oztemel Chair of Armenian Art at Tufts University and the Mary Jaharis Center for Byzantine Art and Culture at Hellenic College Holy Cross in Brookline, MA, that explores the cultures of the eastern frontier of the Byzantine empire in the late antique and medieval periods.

For questions, contact Brandie Ratliff, Director, Mary Jaharis Center for Byzantine Art and Culture (mjcbac@hchc.edu).

http://eastofbyzantium.org/upcoming-events/a-medieval-armenian-text-in-its-eurasian-context/

ICMA ANNUAL MEETING: 14 February 2019, 7-9pm, New York

THE ICMA ANNUAL MEETING

THURSDAY 14 FEBRUARY 2019
7pm-9pm


House of the Redeemer
7 E 95th Street
New York, NY 10128


Join us as we honor Linda Safran and Adam Cohen for their editorship of Gesta, George Spera, as he retires as our pro-bono lawyer, and Fronia W. Simpson, our longtime copyeditor of Gesta. We also thank outgoing Directors, Associates, committee chairs and committee members. 

We will welcome new Gesta editors Susan Boynton and Diane J. Reilly, as well as announce and welcome recently elected board members. 

Drinks and small bites will be served.

ALL ARE WELCOME.

ICMA session at CAA: FAMILIAR OBJECTS: TAKING ANOTHER LOOK AT MEDIEVAL ART (Sat 16 Feb)

ICMA session at CAA New York 2019
FAMILIAR OBJECTS: TAKING ANOTHER LOOK AT MEDIEVAL ART

Date:  Saturday 16 February 
Time:  4:00-5:30 PM
Location: New York Hilton Midtown - 2nd Floor - Sutton North

Organizer and Chair: Lynn A. Jones, Florida State University
Discussant: Robert Nelson, Yale University

The Miniatures in the Rabbula Gospels and Iconographic Analysis: Everything Old Is New Again
Felicity J. Harley-McGowan, Yale University

Looking Again and Again: The Cross of the Scriptures at Clonmacnoise
Heather Pulliam, Edinburgh University

Touching the Treasury: The Golden Spaces of the Uta Codex (Munich: Bayerische Staatsbibliothek, CLM 13601)
Eliza B. Garrison, Middlebury College

Reexamining the Message of the Vestibule Mosaic of Hagia Sophia
Lynn A. Jones, Florida State University


Call for Sessions: Mary Jaharis Center Sponsored Panel, 45th Annual Byzantine Studies Conference

Call for Sessions: Mary Jaharis Center Sponsored Panel, 45th Annual Byzantine Studies Conference

Deadline: February 10, 2019

As part of its ongoing commitment to Byzantine studies, the Mary Jaharis Center for Byzantine Art and Culture seeks proposals for a Mary Jaharis Center sponsored session at the 45th Annual Byzantine Studies Conference to be held in Madison, Wisconsin, October 17–20, 2019. We invite session proposals on any topic relevant to Byzantine studies. The deadline for submission is February 10, 2019. Session proposals must be submitted through the Mary Jaharis Center website.

Session organizers must present a paper in the session or chair the session. If a co-organzier is proposed for the session, the co-organizer must also give a paper in the session or chair the session.

Applicants will be notified by February 15, 2019. The organizer of the selected session is responsible for submitting the session to the BSC by February 25, 2019.

If the proposed session is approved, the Mary Jaharis Center will reimburse session participants (presenters and chair, if the proposed chair is selected by the BSC program committee) up to $600 maximum for North American residents and up to $1200 maximum for those coming from abroad. Funding is through reimbursement only.

https://maryjahariscenter.org/sponsored-sessions/45th-annual-byzantine-studies-conference

Charles Rufus Morey Book Award

Charles Rufus Morey Book Award

Olga Bush, Reframing the Alhambra: Architecture, Poetry, Textiles and Court Ceremonial (Edinburgh University Press, 2018) was a finalist for the 2019 Charles Rufus Morey Book Award, which "honors an especially distinguished book in the history of art, published in the English language" (College Art Association).

http://www.collegeart.org/news/2019/01/17/announcing-the-2019-awards-for-distinction-recipients/

CAA session: A Carolingian Legacy

College Art Association session:
A Carolingian Legacy in the Arts of Normandy and Anglo-Norman England

Friday, February 15, 2019
6:00 PM - 7:30 PM
Madison Suite, New York Hilton Midtown

Terence (Ted) Bertrand Dewsnap, Chair

Lisa A. Reilly, The Invention of Norman Visual Culture & the Carolingian Past
Elizabeth C. Pastan, Inventory and Legacy at Bayeux Cathedral
Jenny H. Shaffer, Saint-Pierre at Jumièges: A Fragment in Time

http://caa.confex.com/caa/2019/meetingapp.cgi/Session/1464

Call for Papers: New Approaches to the Archive in the Middle Ages, due 15 Feb

Call for Papers: New Approaches to the Archive in the Middle Ages

due 15 February 2019

The School of Art History, SAIMS and Special Collections Division at the University of St Andrews are pleased to announce an upcoming two-day conference on the archive in medieval art and thought.

The word archive suggests the acts of taxonomy and conservation, but also interpretation and regulation. Its etymology traces back to the Greek arkheion, thus highlighting the political nature of the physical archive and the act of archiving itself. The medieval world maintained this sense of privileged access. Isidore of Seville connected the Latin word archivium with arca, strongbox, and arcanum, mystery. But the term was malleable, referring to collections of various goods and treasures, not just of parchment records and registers. And yet, Michael Clanchy has argued that the medieval mind did not always distinguish between the library and the archive, as we do today.

The organisers therefore invite proposals on the theme of the expanded medieval archive, as it relates to art and material culture. What can medieval collections, compilations, and assemblages of material things tell us about the accumulation of knowledge and the preservation of memory? How is the archive manipulated to fit political or social agendas, and by whom? What are the limits of the medieval archive? Paper topics and themes may include, though are not limited to:

Records or inventories of collections, secular, civic, and ecclesiastical;
The archive as a physical object or visual record, including books and manuscripts, buildings, reliquaries, etc.;
The accretive nature of written testimony in the form of: chronicles, herbals, visitations, necrologies, inscriptions and tituli;
Time, writing history through the material, and collapsing temporalities;
The creation and perpetuation of memory, identity, and authority;
The accumulation and transmission of cultural or familial knowledge via material culture;
The politics of preservation, documentation, and display in the medieval world, and of the medieval in the modern world.

Collecting, Curating, Assembling: New Approaches to the Archive in the Middle Ages will take place 13–14 September 2019 in St Andrews, Scotland. Professor Erik Inglis (Oberlin College) will deliver the keynote. The organisers intend to publish the conference proceedings as an edited volume.

All papers must be no more than 30 minutes maxmimum. Please submit a 250 word abstract and title by 15 February 2019. Prof Julian Luxford, Prof Kathryn Rudy, and Dr Emily Savage, along with Senior Archivist Rachel Hart, warmly welcome all submissions and queries at medievalarchive@st-andrews.ac.uk.

http://medievalarchive2019.wordpress.com/

CFP: Pilgrimage the Senses, due 20 January

Pilgrimage the Senses CfP

due January 20th

This interdisciplinary conference hosted at the University of Oxford aims to shed light on how sensory perception shapes and is shaped by the experience of pilgrimage across cultures, faith traditions, and throughout history.

Pilgrimages present an intriguing paradox. Grounded in physical experiences—a journey (real or imagined), encounters with sites and/or relics, and commemorative tokens—they also simultaneously demand a devotional focus on the metaphysical. A ubiquitous and long-lasting devotional practice, pilgrimage is a useful lens through which to examine how humans encounter the sacred through the tools of perception available to us. Focusing on the ways in which pilgrimage engages the senses will contribute to our knowledge of how people have historically understood both religious experience and their bodies as vehicles of devotional participation.

We call on speakers to grapple with the challenges of understanding the sensory experience of spiritual phenomena, while bearing in mind that understandings of the senses can vary according to specific cultural contexts. While the five senses are a natural starting point, we are open to including papers that deal with "sense" in a more general way, such as senses of time and place.

https://www.pilgrimagesenses2019.com/cfp/

due 1 Feb: Byzantine Materiality CFP

Byzantine Materiality CFP

February 1, 2019

Popular descriptions of Byzantium often emphasize the mystical and immaterial while overlooking the mediating role of matter implied by the Christian belief in the incarnation. In the field of art history and across the humanities, a new interest in matter and materials constitutes what is now being referred to as the “material turn” or “new materialisms.”

This conference explores matter, materials, and materiality in Byzantine art and culture. It aims to examine material strategies of objects, makers, and users; the agency and affective properties of materials and objects; Byzantine depictions and descriptions of matter in images and texts; and the senses and embodied experiences in Byzantium.

In addition to our speakers, limited space is available for additional 20 minute papers.

We invite scholars and graduate students from a range of fields—including but not limited to history of art and architecture, archeology, liturgical studies, musicology/sound studies, theology, philosophy, and history—to submit paper proposals.

Please send your abstract (300 words maximum) and academic CV to Evan Freeman at byzantinemateriality@svots.edu by February 1, 2019.

Limited financial aid is available for graduate students giving papers.

http://www.sacredartsinitiative.com/byzantinemateriality

due 18 January: CFP 'The Saint Enshrined: European Tabernacle-altarpieces, c.1150-1400' (International Symposium, Valladolid, 7-8 June 2019))

CfP 'The Saint Enshrined: European Tabernacle-altarpieces, c.1150-1400' (International Symposium, Valladolid, 7-8 June 2019))

Deadline 18 January 2019

Almost every Medieval church had one or more sculptures of saints, many of which were placed on altars, in wall niches or in so-called tabernacle-altarpieces. This last category refers to three-dimensional, canopied structures, embellished with bright colours and equipped with movable wings that housed cult images of the Virgin and Child or saints. This early type of altarpiece became widespread in Europe between c.1150 and 1400. Nowadays, examples are scarce and often fragmented, overpainted and reconstructed. Most of them come from the geographical periphery of Europe and almost all of them are now without their original context, as they hang on museum walls or in churches as isolated relics.

The purpose of this international symposium is to explore and discuss early tabernacle-altarpieces in different regions of Europe: their provenance, patronage, function, and role in popular piety. We invite speakers to submit proposals for 15-minute papers to be presented during the symposium. Proposals should go beyond case studies and look at such topics as the use and re-use of tabernacle-altarpieces, media involved in their creation, regional differences, etc.

Proposals of c.300 words should be submitted to Fernando Gutiérrez Baños, fbanos@fyl.uva.es.

DEADLINE: Friday 18th of January 2019. All proposals will be examined by the Scientific Committee. It is hoped that an edited volume of the symposium proceedings will be published. Successful candidates will be offered free registration.

SCIENTIFIC COMMITTEE: Fernando Gutiérrez Baños, Universidad de Valladolid; Justin Kroesen, Universitetsmuseet i Bergen; Elisabeth Andersen, Norsk institutt for kulturminneforskning.

KEYNOTE SPEAKERS: These will include members of the Scientific Committee; Stephan Kemperdick, Staatliche Museen zu Berlin, Gemäldegalerie; Teresa Laguna Paúl, Universidad de Sevilla; Cristiana Pasqualetti, Università degli Studi dell’Aquila; and Alberto Velasco Gonzàlez, Universitat de Lleida.

PROGRAM (PROVISIONAL): Friday 7th of June, session held in the Universidad de Valladolid (Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Sala de Juntas); Saturday 8th of June, field trip to sites in the Diocese of Vitoria.

http://historiadelarte.uva.es/2018/10/simposio-internacional-the-saint-enshrined-european-tabernacle-altarpices-c-1150-1400-valladolid-7-8-de-junio-de-2019-abierto-el-plazo-para-la-presentacion-de-propuestas-de-comunicacion-call-for/

Public lecture at the Bibliotheca Hertziana–Max Planck Institut for Art History, Rome: Dr. Francesca Dell'Acqua

Public lecture at the Bibliotheca Hertziana–Max Planck Institut for Art History, Rome

Dr. Francesca Dell'Acqua
Toccare il Dio Incarnato. Amuleti e preghiera ‘tattile’ durante l’Iconoclasmo bizantino tra Bisanzio e Roma 21 Jan 2019, h 18.00

This lecture will focus on pectoral crosses which functioned as relic containers and amulets and were characterised by figural imagery as well as by inscriptions.

Apparently produced between the late eighth and the early ninth centuries, their geographical origins are still contested between Byzantium and Rome, while other alternatives have yet to be fully considered.

These pectoral crosses bear inscriptions in Greek which have been interpreted as ‘incorrect’, but instead seem to reflect the conventions of spoken language in an evolving hellenophone Mediterranean. These inscriptions were possibly intended to be read during private prayer and meditation while holding the pendant hanging from one’s neck.

In particular, I will focus on a now lost enkolpion, whose inscriptions in Latin and Greek reveal it was intended for an audience familiar with both languages, at least in religious practices.

One of its inscriptions quotes a well-known liturgical hymn sung at Mass before the celebration of the Eucharist and offers scope for a wider investigation into the function as well as cultural origins of such pectoral crosses.

The combination of figural illustrations, variety of precious materials, relics, and inscriptions on such pectoral crosses was probably aimed at eliciting a sort of tactile prayer and at suggesting multiple ways to apprehend the Incarnate Logos: by looking at, touching, reading, praying, meditating, and kissing the container.

http://www.biblhertz.it/en/news/event-calendar/event-details/?tx_ttnews%5Btt_news%5D=1025&cHash=456e653fe98ec4ff065691b5c7cbedea

CFP (due 18 Jan 2019) 'The Saint Enshrined: European Tabernacle-altarpieces, c.1150-1400' (International Symposium, Valladolid, 7-8 June 2019))

CfP 'The Saint Enshrined: European Tabernacle-altarpieces, c.1150-1400' (International Symposium, Valladolid, 7-8 June 2019))

Deadline 18 January 2019

Almost every Medieval church had one or more sculptures of saints, many of which were placed on altars, in wall niches or in so-called tabernacle-altarpieces. This last category refers to three-dimensional, canopied structures, embellished with bright colours and equipped with movable wings that housed cult images of the Virgin and Child or saints. This early type of altarpiece became widespread in Europe between c.1150 and 1400. Nowadays, examples are scarce and often fragmented, overpainted and reconstructed. Most of them come from the geographical periphery of Europe and almost all of them are now without their original context, as they hang on museum walls or in churches as isolated relics.

The purpose of this international symposium is to explore and discuss early tabernacle-altarpieces in different regions of Europe: their provenance, patronage, function, and role in popular piety. We invite speakers to submit proposals for 15-minute papers to be presented during the symposium. Proposals should go beyond case studies and look at such topics as the use and re-use of tabernacle-altarpieces, media involved in their creation, regional differences, etc.

Proposals of c.300 words should be submitted to Fernando Gutiérrez Baños, fbanos@fyl.uva.es. DEADLINE: Friday 18th of January 2019. All proposals will be examined by the Scientific Committee. It is hoped that an edited volume of the symposium proceedings will be published. Successful candidates will be offered free registration.

SCIENTIFIC COMMITTEE: Fernando Gutiérrez Baños, Universidad de Valladolid; Justin Kroesen, Universitetsmuseet i Bergen; Elisabeth Andersen, Norsk institutt for kulturminneforskning.

KEYNOTE SPEAKERS: These will include members of the Scientific Committee; Stephan Kemperdick, Staatliche Museen zu Berlin, Gemäldegalerie; Teresa Laguna Paúl, Universidad de Sevilla; Cristiana Pasqualetti, Università degli Studi dell’Aquila; and Alberto Velasco Gonzàlez, Universitat de Lleida.

PROGRAM (PROVISIONAL): Friday 7th of June, session held in the Universidad de Valladolid (Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Sala de Juntas); Saturday 8th of June, field trip to sites in the Diocese of Vitoria.

http://historiadelarte.uva.es/2018/10/simposio-internacional-the-saint-enshrined-european-tabernacle-altarpices-c-1150-1400-valladolid-7-8-de-junio-de-2019-abierto-el-plazo-para-la-presentacion-de-propuestas-de-comunicacion-call-for/

Due 27 January 2019: The Met's Museum Seminar (MuSe) Internship Program; Summer 2019

The Museum Seminar (MuSe) Internship Program

The Museum Seminar (MuSe) Internship Program awards ten-week, nine-month, or twelve-month internships to students interested in a career in the arts and fields related to The Met's many departments, at both The Met Fifth Avenue and The Met Cloisters. In addition to developing skills through projects within Museum departments, interns participate in a weekly seminar series and interact directly with the Museum's visitors by leading public tours in the galleries.

Long term nine-month and twelve-month internships are also available. These long-term interns fully participate in the MuSe program during the summer.

The MuSe Internship Program begins on the first Monday in June. All interns must start on this date; there are no exceptions. Ten-week internships end the second week of August, when the summer MuSe program concludes. Long-term interns remain and work with their supervisors for the remainder of their internship periods.

https://www.metmuseum.org/about-the-met/internships/undergraduate-and-graduate-students/summer