ICMA ANNUAL MEETING: 14 February 2019, 7-9pm, New York

THE ICMA ANNUAL MEETING

THURSDAY 14 FEBRUARY 2019
7pm-9pm


House of the Redeemer
7 E 95th Street
New York, NY 10128


Join us as we honor Linda Safran and Adam Cohen for their editorship of Gesta, George Spera, as he retires as our pro-bono lawyer, and Fronia W. Simpson, our longtime copyeditor of Gesta. We also thank outgoing Directors, Associates, committee chairs and committee members. 

We will welcome new Gesta editors Susan Boynton and Diane J. Reilly, as well as announce and welcome recently elected board members. 

Drinks and small bites will be served.

ALL ARE WELCOME.

ICMA session at CAA: FAMILIAR OBJECTS: TAKING ANOTHER LOOK AT MEDIEVAL ART (Sat 16 Feb)

ICMA session at CAA New York 2019
FAMILIAR OBJECTS: TAKING ANOTHER LOOK AT MEDIEVAL ART

Date:  Saturday 16 February 
Time:  4:00-5:30 PM
Location: New York Hilton Midtown - 2nd Floor - Sutton North

Organizer and Chair: Lynn A. Jones, Florida State University
Discussant: Robert Nelson, Yale University

The Miniatures in the Rabbula Gospels and Iconographic Analysis: Everything Old Is New Again
Felicity J. Harley-McGowan, Yale University

Looking Again and Again: The Cross of the Scriptures at Clonmacnoise
Heather Pulliam, Edinburgh University

Touching the Treasury: The Golden Spaces of the Uta Codex (Munich: Bayerische Staatsbibliothek, CLM 13601)
Eliza B. Garrison, Middlebury College

Reexamining the Message of the Vestibule Mosaic of Hagia Sophia
Lynn A. Jones, Florida State University


Call for Sessions: Mary Jaharis Center Sponsored Panel, 45th Annual Byzantine Studies Conference

Call for Sessions: Mary Jaharis Center Sponsored Panel, 45th Annual Byzantine Studies Conference

Deadline: February 10, 2019

As part of its ongoing commitment to Byzantine studies, the Mary Jaharis Center for Byzantine Art and Culture seeks proposals for a Mary Jaharis Center sponsored session at the 45th Annual Byzantine Studies Conference to be held in Madison, Wisconsin, October 17–20, 2019. We invite session proposals on any topic relevant to Byzantine studies. The deadline for submission is February 10, 2019. Session proposals must be submitted through the Mary Jaharis Center website.

Session organizers must present a paper in the session or chair the session. If a co-organzier is proposed for the session, the co-organizer must also give a paper in the session or chair the session.

Applicants will be notified by February 15, 2019. The organizer of the selected session is responsible for submitting the session to the BSC by February 25, 2019.

If the proposed session is approved, the Mary Jaharis Center will reimburse session participants (presenters and chair, if the proposed chair is selected by the BSC program committee) up to $600 maximum for North American residents and up to $1200 maximum for those coming from abroad. Funding is through reimbursement only.

https://maryjahariscenter.org/sponsored-sessions/45th-annual-byzantine-studies-conference

Charles Rufus Morey Book Award

Charles Rufus Morey Book Award

Olga Bush, Reframing the Alhambra: Architecture, Poetry, Textiles and Court Ceremonial (Edinburgh University Press, 2018) was a finalist for the 2019 Charles Rufus Morey Book Award, which "honors an especially distinguished book in the history of art, published in the English language" (College Art Association).

http://www.collegeart.org/news/2019/01/17/announcing-the-2019-awards-for-distinction-recipients/

CAA session: A Carolingian Legacy

College Art Association session:
A Carolingian Legacy in the Arts of Normandy and Anglo-Norman England

Friday, February 15, 2019
6:00 PM - 7:30 PM
Madison Suite, New York Hilton Midtown

Terence (Ted) Bertrand Dewsnap, Chair

Lisa A. Reilly, The Invention of Norman Visual Culture & the Carolingian Past
Elizabeth C. Pastan, Inventory and Legacy at Bayeux Cathedral
Jenny H. Shaffer, Saint-Pierre at Jumièges: A Fragment in Time

http://caa.confex.com/caa/2019/meetingapp.cgi/Session/1464

Call for Papers: New Approaches to the Archive in the Middle Ages, due 15 Feb

Call for Papers: New Approaches to the Archive in the Middle Ages

due 15 February 2019

The School of Art History, SAIMS and Special Collections Division at the University of St Andrews are pleased to announce an upcoming two-day conference on the archive in medieval art and thought.

The word archive suggests the acts of taxonomy and conservation, but also interpretation and regulation. Its etymology traces back to the Greek arkheion, thus highlighting the political nature of the physical archive and the act of archiving itself. The medieval world maintained this sense of privileged access. Isidore of Seville connected the Latin word archivium with arca, strongbox, and arcanum, mystery. But the term was malleable, referring to collections of various goods and treasures, not just of parchment records and registers. And yet, Michael Clanchy has argued that the medieval mind did not always distinguish between the library and the archive, as we do today.

The organisers therefore invite proposals on the theme of the expanded medieval archive, as it relates to art and material culture. What can medieval collections, compilations, and assemblages of material things tell us about the accumulation of knowledge and the preservation of memory? How is the archive manipulated to fit political or social agendas, and by whom? What are the limits of the medieval archive? Paper topics and themes may include, though are not limited to:

Records or inventories of collections, secular, civic, and ecclesiastical;
The archive as a physical object or visual record, including books and manuscripts, buildings, reliquaries, etc.;
The accretive nature of written testimony in the form of: chronicles, herbals, visitations, necrologies, inscriptions and tituli;
Time, writing history through the material, and collapsing temporalities;
The creation and perpetuation of memory, identity, and authority;
The accumulation and transmission of cultural or familial knowledge via material culture;
The politics of preservation, documentation, and display in the medieval world, and of the medieval in the modern world.

Collecting, Curating, Assembling: New Approaches to the Archive in the Middle Ages will take place 13–14 September 2019 in St Andrews, Scotland. Professor Erik Inglis (Oberlin College) will deliver the keynote. The organisers intend to publish the conference proceedings as an edited volume.

All papers must be no more than 30 minutes maxmimum. Please submit a 250 word abstract and title by 15 February 2019. Prof Julian Luxford, Prof Kathryn Rudy, and Dr Emily Savage, along with Senior Archivist Rachel Hart, warmly welcome all submissions and queries at medievalarchive@st-andrews.ac.uk.

http://medievalarchive2019.wordpress.com/

CFP: Pilgrimage the Senses, due 20 January

Pilgrimage the Senses CfP

due January 20th

This interdisciplinary conference hosted at the University of Oxford aims to shed light on how sensory perception shapes and is shaped by the experience of pilgrimage across cultures, faith traditions, and throughout history.

Pilgrimages present an intriguing paradox. Grounded in physical experiences—a journey (real or imagined), encounters with sites and/or relics, and commemorative tokens—they also simultaneously demand a devotional focus on the metaphysical. A ubiquitous and long-lasting devotional practice, pilgrimage is a useful lens through which to examine how humans encounter the sacred through the tools of perception available to us. Focusing on the ways in which pilgrimage engages the senses will contribute to our knowledge of how people have historically understood both religious experience and their bodies as vehicles of devotional participation.

We call on speakers to grapple with the challenges of understanding the sensory experience of spiritual phenomena, while bearing in mind that understandings of the senses can vary according to specific cultural contexts. While the five senses are a natural starting point, we are open to including papers that deal with "sense" in a more general way, such as senses of time and place.

https://www.pilgrimagesenses2019.com/cfp/

due 1 Feb: Byzantine Materiality CFP

Byzantine Materiality CFP

February 1, 2019

Popular descriptions of Byzantium often emphasize the mystical and immaterial while overlooking the mediating role of matter implied by the Christian belief in the incarnation. In the field of art history and across the humanities, a new interest in matter and materials constitutes what is now being referred to as the “material turn” or “new materialisms.”

This conference explores matter, materials, and materiality in Byzantine art and culture. It aims to examine material strategies of objects, makers, and users; the agency and affective properties of materials and objects; Byzantine depictions and descriptions of matter in images and texts; and the senses and embodied experiences in Byzantium.

In addition to our speakers, limited space is available for additional 20 minute papers.

We invite scholars and graduate students from a range of fields—including but not limited to history of art and architecture, archeology, liturgical studies, musicology/sound studies, theology, philosophy, and history—to submit paper proposals.

Please send your abstract (300 words maximum) and academic CV to Evan Freeman at byzantinemateriality@svots.edu by February 1, 2019.

Limited financial aid is available for graduate students giving papers.

http://www.sacredartsinitiative.com/byzantinemateriality

due 18 January: CFP 'The Saint Enshrined: European Tabernacle-altarpieces, c.1150-1400' (International Symposium, Valladolid, 7-8 June 2019))

CfP 'The Saint Enshrined: European Tabernacle-altarpieces, c.1150-1400' (International Symposium, Valladolid, 7-8 June 2019))

Deadline 18 January 2019

Almost every Medieval church had one or more sculptures of saints, many of which were placed on altars, in wall niches or in so-called tabernacle-altarpieces. This last category refers to three-dimensional, canopied structures, embellished with bright colours and equipped with movable wings that housed cult images of the Virgin and Child or saints. This early type of altarpiece became widespread in Europe between c.1150 and 1400. Nowadays, examples are scarce and often fragmented, overpainted and reconstructed. Most of them come from the geographical periphery of Europe and almost all of them are now without their original context, as they hang on museum walls or in churches as isolated relics.

The purpose of this international symposium is to explore and discuss early tabernacle-altarpieces in different regions of Europe: their provenance, patronage, function, and role in popular piety. We invite speakers to submit proposals for 15-minute papers to be presented during the symposium. Proposals should go beyond case studies and look at such topics as the use and re-use of tabernacle-altarpieces, media involved in their creation, regional differences, etc.

Proposals of c.300 words should be submitted to Fernando Gutiérrez Baños, fbanos@fyl.uva.es.

DEADLINE: Friday 18th of January 2019. All proposals will be examined by the Scientific Committee. It is hoped that an edited volume of the symposium proceedings will be published. Successful candidates will be offered free registration.

SCIENTIFIC COMMITTEE: Fernando Gutiérrez Baños, Universidad de Valladolid; Justin Kroesen, Universitetsmuseet i Bergen; Elisabeth Andersen, Norsk institutt for kulturminneforskning.

KEYNOTE SPEAKERS: These will include members of the Scientific Committee; Stephan Kemperdick, Staatliche Museen zu Berlin, Gemäldegalerie; Teresa Laguna Paúl, Universidad de Sevilla; Cristiana Pasqualetti, Università degli Studi dell’Aquila; and Alberto Velasco Gonzàlez, Universitat de Lleida.

PROGRAM (PROVISIONAL): Friday 7th of June, session held in the Universidad de Valladolid (Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Sala de Juntas); Saturday 8th of June, field trip to sites in the Diocese of Vitoria.

http://historiadelarte.uva.es/2018/10/simposio-internacional-the-saint-enshrined-european-tabernacle-altarpices-c-1150-1400-valladolid-7-8-de-junio-de-2019-abierto-el-plazo-para-la-presentacion-de-propuestas-de-comunicacion-call-for/

Public lecture at the Bibliotheca Hertziana–Max Planck Institut for Art History, Rome: Dr. Francesca Dell'Acqua

Public lecture at the Bibliotheca Hertziana–Max Planck Institut for Art History, Rome

Dr. Francesca Dell'Acqua
Toccare il Dio Incarnato. Amuleti e preghiera ‘tattile’ durante l’Iconoclasmo bizantino tra Bisanzio e Roma 21 Jan 2019, h 18.00

This lecture will focus on pectoral crosses which functioned as relic containers and amulets and were characterised by figural imagery as well as by inscriptions.

Apparently produced between the late eighth and the early ninth centuries, their geographical origins are still contested between Byzantium and Rome, while other alternatives have yet to be fully considered.

These pectoral crosses bear inscriptions in Greek which have been interpreted as ‘incorrect’, but instead seem to reflect the conventions of spoken language in an evolving hellenophone Mediterranean. These inscriptions were possibly intended to be read during private prayer and meditation while holding the pendant hanging from one’s neck.

In particular, I will focus on a now lost enkolpion, whose inscriptions in Latin and Greek reveal it was intended for an audience familiar with both languages, at least in religious practices.

One of its inscriptions quotes a well-known liturgical hymn sung at Mass before the celebration of the Eucharist and offers scope for a wider investigation into the function as well as cultural origins of such pectoral crosses.

The combination of figural illustrations, variety of precious materials, relics, and inscriptions on such pectoral crosses was probably aimed at eliciting a sort of tactile prayer and at suggesting multiple ways to apprehend the Incarnate Logos: by looking at, touching, reading, praying, meditating, and kissing the container.

http://www.biblhertz.it/en/news/event-calendar/event-details/?tx_ttnews%5Btt_news%5D=1025&cHash=456e653fe98ec4ff065691b5c7cbedea

CFP (due 18 Jan 2019) 'The Saint Enshrined: European Tabernacle-altarpieces, c.1150-1400' (International Symposium, Valladolid, 7-8 June 2019))

CfP 'The Saint Enshrined: European Tabernacle-altarpieces, c.1150-1400' (International Symposium, Valladolid, 7-8 June 2019))

Deadline 18 January 2019

Almost every Medieval church had one or more sculptures of saints, many of which were placed on altars, in wall niches or in so-called tabernacle-altarpieces. This last category refers to three-dimensional, canopied structures, embellished with bright colours and equipped with movable wings that housed cult images of the Virgin and Child or saints. This early type of altarpiece became widespread in Europe between c.1150 and 1400. Nowadays, examples are scarce and often fragmented, overpainted and reconstructed. Most of them come from the geographical periphery of Europe and almost all of them are now without their original context, as they hang on museum walls or in churches as isolated relics.

The purpose of this international symposium is to explore and discuss early tabernacle-altarpieces in different regions of Europe: their provenance, patronage, function, and role in popular piety. We invite speakers to submit proposals for 15-minute papers to be presented during the symposium. Proposals should go beyond case studies and look at such topics as the use and re-use of tabernacle-altarpieces, media involved in their creation, regional differences, etc.

Proposals of c.300 words should be submitted to Fernando Gutiérrez Baños, fbanos@fyl.uva.es. DEADLINE: Friday 18th of January 2019. All proposals will be examined by the Scientific Committee. It is hoped that an edited volume of the symposium proceedings will be published. Successful candidates will be offered free registration.

SCIENTIFIC COMMITTEE: Fernando Gutiérrez Baños, Universidad de Valladolid; Justin Kroesen, Universitetsmuseet i Bergen; Elisabeth Andersen, Norsk institutt for kulturminneforskning.

KEYNOTE SPEAKERS: These will include members of the Scientific Committee; Stephan Kemperdick, Staatliche Museen zu Berlin, Gemäldegalerie; Teresa Laguna Paúl, Universidad de Sevilla; Cristiana Pasqualetti, Università degli Studi dell’Aquila; and Alberto Velasco Gonzàlez, Universitat de Lleida.

PROGRAM (PROVISIONAL): Friday 7th of June, session held in the Universidad de Valladolid (Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Sala de Juntas); Saturday 8th of June, field trip to sites in the Diocese of Vitoria.

http://historiadelarte.uva.es/2018/10/simposio-internacional-the-saint-enshrined-european-tabernacle-altarpices-c-1150-1400-valladolid-7-8-de-junio-de-2019-abierto-el-plazo-para-la-presentacion-de-propuestas-de-comunicacion-call-for/

Due 27 January 2019: The Met's Museum Seminar (MuSe) Internship Program; Summer 2019

The Museum Seminar (MuSe) Internship Program

The Museum Seminar (MuSe) Internship Program awards ten-week, nine-month, or twelve-month internships to students interested in a career in the arts and fields related to The Met's many departments, at both The Met Fifth Avenue and The Met Cloisters. In addition to developing skills through projects within Museum departments, interns participate in a weekly seminar series and interact directly with the Museum's visitors by leading public tours in the galleries.

Long term nine-month and twelve-month internships are also available. These long-term interns fully participate in the MuSe program during the summer.

The MuSe Internship Program begins on the first Monday in June. All interns must start on this date; there are no exceptions. Ten-week internships end the second week of August, when the summer MuSe program concludes. Long-term interns remain and work with their supervisors for the remainder of their internship periods.

https://www.metmuseum.org/about-the-met/internships/undergraduate-and-graduate-students/summer

Due 1 Feb 2019: Pontifical Institute of Mediaeval Studies, 2019-2020 Mellon Post-Doctoral Fellowships

Pontifical Institute of Mediaeval Studies offers post-doctoral fellowships to be used for research at the Institute in the medieval field of the holder’s choice. Mellon Fellows will also participate in the interdisciplinary Research Seminars.

The Mellon Fellowships are intended for young medievalists of exceptional promise who have completed their doctoral work, ordinarily within the previous five years, including those who are starting on their professional academic careers at approximately the Assistant Professor level. Fellowships are valued at approximately CAN $40,000


Applications for the academic year 2019-2020 should be emailed in PDF format to the Institute Secretary at barbara.north@utoronto.ca. Reference letters may also be emailed directly by the referee to the Institute Secretary. Completed applications, as well as all supporting documentation, must be received no later than 1 February 2019. The awarding institution must send official confirmation that the PhD has been examined and approved to the postal address below. All documentation must be received by the application deadline.

Application forms and further details may be obtained at: http://www.pims.ca/academics/post-doctoral-mellon-fellowships

Pontifical Institute of Mediaeval Studies
59 Queen’s Park Crescent East
Toronto, Ontario, CANADA
M55 2C4

CFP: Fables and the Art of Preaching in the Middle Ages and Early Modern Period (Erlangen, 15–16 May 2019)

Fabel und Predigt im Mittelalter und in der Frühen Neuzeit (Erlangen, 15.-16. Mai 2019)

 

Der Lehrstuhl für Lateinische Philologie des Mittelalters und der Neuzeit der FAU organisiert im Mai 2019 eine Internationale Tagung zum Thema "Fabel und Predigt". Fabeln waren in der Vormoderne nicht nur unterhaltende und im Unterricht gut einsetzbare Texte. Ihr belehrender, moralisierender Charakter prädestinierte sie, als Exempla für die Predigt verwendet zu werden. Im Spätmittelalter entstanden auch spezifische Sammlungen dazu. Der Call for Papers richtet sich an junge Wissenschaftler bis 35 Jahren, die die Ergebnisse ihrer Forschungen über lateinische und volkssprachliche Fabeln und ihre Anwendung bis ca.1650 vorstellen möchten. Interessenten sollten einen Lebenslauf und eine kurze Vorstellung ihres Vorhabens bis zum 1. März 2019 einreichen. Die ausgewählten Referenten erhalten einen Pauschale für Reise- und Aufenthaltskosten in Höhe von 160 €. Weitere Informationen finden Sie unter: http://mittellatein.phil.fau.de/index.html#Aktuelles

 

 

Fables and the Art of Preaching in the Middle Ages and Early Modern Period (Erlangen, 15–16 May 2019)

 

The Department of Latin Philology in the Middle Ages and Modern Period at FAU is organizing an international conference in May 2019 on the theme of Fables and Preaching. In the premodern period, fables were not only texts used for entertainment and in classrooms. Their edifying, moralizing character predisposed them for use as exempla in preaching. In the late Middle Ages specific collections were even created for this purpose. This Call for Papers is directed at young scholars up to the age of 35, who would like to present the results of their research on Latin and vernacular fables and their use up to c. 1650. Interested individuals should submit a curriculum vitae and a short proposal by 1 March 2019. Selected speakers will receive a fixed sum of 160 euros for the costs of travel and accommodation. Further information can be found at http://mittellatein.phil.fau.de/index.html#Aktuelles

Due 30 November: IMS-Paris 2019 symposium CFP. Time/ Le temps

Call for Papers – Time/ Le temps Symposium of the International Medieval Society, Paris

Time/ Le temps

Symposium of the International Medieval Society, Paris
Paris, 8–10 July /juillet 2019
L’appel à communications français suit l’appel anglais.

Call for Papers:

“What is time?” asked St. Augustine. “Who can comprehend this even in thought so as to articulate the answer in words? Yet what do we speak of, in our familiar everyday conversation, more than of time?”

From the diverse reckoning of historical dates to the calculation of the date of Easter and the elaboration of the liturgical calendar, medieval scholars counted time. The movement of the bodies in the night sky allowed medieval viewers to calculate the hour, and so did such instruments as the sundial, the water clock, the candle clock, and eventually the mechanical clock. Architects, sculptors, illuminators, and artisans strove to represent time iconographically in different media, and complex programs of images employed allegorical or anagogical relations in order to interweave narratives. Narrative writers experimented with ways to represent the passage of time and organize narrative action, while lyric poets used patterned repetition to turn time back on itself. In the domain of musical notation, late medieval theorists developed different ways of indicating rhythm, a phenomenon whose absence from earlier notation, such as that of vernacular monophony, has inspired debates among modern scholars.

In the medieval monastic context, time consisted of nested cycles that determined daily, monthly, and annual practice by building concrete associations between time and types of labor, reading, and eating. In this, time not only corresponded to, but was a feature of, a material world that could be transcended through contemplation. For their part, philosophers and theologians reflected on the points of articulation between different temporalities: the linear and finite time of human life, the cyclical time of the liturgy, the eschatological time of Salvation.

Today, historians ask with Jacques Le Goff, “Must we chop up history into slices?,” and some question the traditional period markers that separate Antiquity from the Middle Ages and the Middle Ages from the Renaissance, as well as the effects of that periodization for conceptualizing the historical object.

How, therefore, can we best reflect on duration, on the event, on the moment? How can we reflect on the experience of time’s dilation, or of its depth?

For its 16th annual symposium, the International Medieval Society Paris invites scholarly papers on any aspect of time in the Middle Ages. Papers may deal with the experience or exploitation of time, its reckoning or measuring, its inscription, its theorization, or the question of how or why or whether we should demarcate the “Middle Ages.” Papers focusing on historical or cultural material from medieval France or post-Roman Gaul, or on texts written in medieval French or Occitan, are particularly encouraged, but compelling papers on other material will also be considered.

The annual symposium of the International Medieval Society Paris is an interdisciplinary, international, bilingual meeting of faculty, researchers, and advanced graduate students. We welcome submissions in French or English from art history, musicology, studies of ritual or liturgy, history of dance, literature, linguistics, philosophy, theology, anthropology, history, history of science and technology, or archaeology.

An abstract of no more than 300 words (in French or English) for a paper of 20 minutes should be sent, along with a CV, to communications.ims.paris@gmail.com by 30 November. Abstracts will receive a preliminary blind review before the final selection and should give a clear idea of the topic and anticipated argument of the paper. Presenters will be notified of their selection in January 2019.


Job alert: Assistant Curator, Medieval and Renaissance Manuscripts; The Morgan Library & Museum

Assistant Curator, Medieval and Renaissance Manuscripts

(Full-time)

Responsibilities: 

The Morgan Library & Museum invites applications for a new position of Assistant Curator in the Department of Medieval and Renaissance Manuscripts. The Assistant Curator organizes exhibitions, researches the collection, hosts class visits and other educational activities, assists with collection development and acquisitions, cultivates donors and fundraising opportunities, performs reference services, inventories collections, maintains departmental files, and creates or revises records for collection items. The position reports to the Melvin R. Seiden Curator and Department Head of Medieval and Renaissance Manuscripts, and will work alongside the present Assistant Curator.

The Morgan Library & Museum is committed to diversity and is proud to be an equal opportunity employer.

Qualifications: 

  • Ph.D. in art history with an emphasis on manuscript illumination and medieval art required.

  • Experience in museum work and/or the academic field of art history; curatorial experience in medieval manuscripts preferred.

  • Specialized knowledge of medieval and Renaissance manuscript illumination essential, as well as general familiarity with medieval and Renaissance art.

  • Ability to organize exhibitions, write and edit publications (both scholarly and popular) and didactics, and give public lectures and tours.

  • Ability to communicate and deal with a broad range of people in promoting the department’s collection, be they scholars, students, collectors, Fellows and Friends of the Morgan, the department’s visiting committee, or the public.

  • Proven record of independent scholarly research and publications of the highest standards; excellent writing skills.

  • Knowledge of Latin and fluency in French, Italian, or German.

  • Able to work for extended periods at a computer workstation.

  • Able to lift moderately heavy boxes and books and move items to and from shelves.

  • Able to climb ladders, wheel carts with collection items through the facility, and tolerate moderate levels of dust generated during normal activities and movement of objects

Compensation: 

Salary commensurate with experience. Excellent benefits.

To apply: 

Interested applicants should e-mail a cover letter, CV, and salary requirements to: medrensearch@themorgan.org. Select candidates will be asked to supply writing samples and references. All inquiries regarding the position should be addressed to the aforementioned email address.

Please note that due to the high volume of applicants, we are only able to contact those candidates whose skills and background best fit our needs.

The Morgan is an Equal Opportunity Employer. We do not discriminate against any employee or applicant for employment because of race, creed (religion), color, sex (including gender expression), national origin, sexual orientation, military status, age, disability, marital status or domestic violence victim status.

The Morgan Library & Museum is an equal access, equal opportunity employer.


https://www.themorgan.org/opportunities/employment/assistant-curator-medieval-and-renaissance-manuscripts

Max-Planck-Institut’s Kunsthistorisches Institut (KHI) - ANAMED Joint Fellowship

Max-Planck-Institut’s Kunsthistorisches Institut (KHI) - ANAMED Joint Fellowship

The Max-Planck-Institut’s Kunsthistorisches Institut in Florence, Italy (KHI) and Koç University’s Research Center for Anatolian Civilizations (ANAMED) are pleased to announce a joint fellowship for the 2019–2020 academic year to support Post-doctoral or Senior scholars conducting research on archaeology, architecture, art history, heritage, or history to be hosted at KHI and ANAMED.

All candidates must be conversant in English and agree to take on no other obligation (e.g., part-time teaching) during any part of the fellowship term. The successful applicant will hold the fellowship for one academic year, with one term in residence in Florence and one term in residence at ANAMED in Istanbul, and must be able to carry out the proposed research with resources available in these cities. The fellowship offers a combination of benefits the details of which differ between Florence and Istanbul but that include a stipend to cover expenses not already included in the fellowship, international travel costs to and from both locations, accommodation or support for the same, meals or support for the same, health insurance or support for the same, a limited research budget, a work space, and full access to the research and library facilities, events, and scholarly communities hosted within both sponsoring institutions.

Applications are due by 15 December 2018 and should be submitted via the fellowship application system accessible on the ANAMED website. For the application please click here

Questions concerning the fellowship and application process should be directed to anamedapplication@ku.edu.tr.

 

APPLICATION DEADLINE:15 DECEMBER


SYMPOSIUM: Conserving Active Matter: History (New York, 1 Nov 18) RSVP required

Conserving Active Matter: History (New York, 1 Nov 18)

Bard Graduate Center, 38 West 86th Street, New York, NY

This event is part of “Conserving Active Matter: A Cultures of Conservation Research Project,” a collaboration between Bard Graduate Center, the Humboldt University (Berlin), and the Rijksmuseum (Amsterdam). This initiative aims to bring new developments in materials science and new ways of thinking about matter to create new ways of thinking about the future of conservation. The project is articulated through semester-themed explorations along four axes: Indigenous ontologies (spring 2018), history (fall 2018), materials science (spring 2019), and philosophy (fall 2019).

The working group on “Active Matter and History” (Peter N. Miller, Ittai Weinryb) aims to contextualize the current interest in active matter. Probing the boundaries of dualistic thought, from Pre-Socratics to plastics, this workshop will help us understand exactly how we got to the point that the activity of organic matter had to be rediscovered at the beginning of the twenty-first century. Beyond genealogy, however, the recognition that conceptual scene-setting is itself an artifact raises new possibilities for rethinking activity along the arc of all those other victims of dualization, such as the subject/object, archaic/modern, living/non-living, human/non-human, and West/Eastern dichotomies.

MORE INFO: https://www.bgc.bard.edu/events/895/01-nov-2018-symposium-conserving

For RSVP:
https://www.eventbrite.com/e/symposiumconserving-active-matter-history-tickets-49099257200

9:15 am
Welcome and Introduction
Peter N. Miller, Bard Graduate Center
Ittai Weinryb, Bard Graduate Center

9:30 am
Session I: Magic
Frank Klaassen, University of Saskatchewan
Nicolas Weill-Parot, École Pratique des Hautes Études

10:45 am
Coffee Break

11:15 am
Session II: Buddhism
Fabio Rambelli, University of California, Santa Barbara
Wen-shing Chou, Hunter College, CUNY

12:30 pm
Lunch Break

1:30 pm
Session III: Subjectivities
Surekha Davies, The John Carter Brown Library
Daniel Garber, Princeton University

2:45 pm
Coffee Break

3:15 pm
Session IV: Traditions
Moshe Idel, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem
André Laks, Panamerican University

4:30 pm
Coffee Break

5:00 pm
Session V: Modernism
Joyce Tsai, University of Iowa
Claudia Wedepohl, The Warburg Institute

6:15 pm
Reception

Please RSVP here:
https://www.eventbrite.com/e/symposiumconserving-active-matter-history-tickets-49099257200  

 

Bibliographical Society of America Fellowships, due 1 Dec 2018

Date/Deadline: 1 December 2018

To support the mission of the Society to foster the study of books and other textual artifacts in traditional and emerging formats, and in keeping with the value which the Society places on the field of bibliography as a critical interpretative framework for understanding such artifacts, the BSA funds a number of fellowships designed to promote bibliographical inquiry and research.

Bibliographical projects may range chronologically from clay tablets and papyrus rolls to contemporary literary texts and born-digital materials. Topics relating to books and manuscripts in any field and of any period are eligible for consideration as long as they include analysis of the physical object – that is, the handwritten, printed, or other textual artifact – as historical evidence.

Projects may include establishing a text or studying the history of book or manuscript production, publication, distribution, collecting, or reading. Fellowship awards may be used to fund travel to collections and other expenses associated with research into the topic for which the award was made.

Applicants should read the fellowships title and descriptions below to assess the general suitability of their projects to BSA’s program. Please note that individuals who have not received BSA fellowships in the previous five years will be given preference and that projects in enumerative bibliography (i.e., the preparation of lists) are not supported.

The fellowship committee will match proposed projects to suitable fellowships, and the awards will be announced at the annual meeting of the Society on January 24, 2019. All fellowships require a project report within one year of receipt of the award, and copies of any publications resulting from the project are to be sent to the BSA.

http://bibsocamer.org/awards/fellowships/

SCRIPTO Conference Erlangen - Libraries in the Middle Ages and Early Modern Period, due 1 Oct 2018

SCRIPTO Conference Erlangen - Libraries in the Middle Ages and Early Modern Period

Erlangen (Bamberg, Neustadt a.d.A.), 5th to 7th December 2018

 

Libraries are not only places where books are stored. They are also complex institutions which form nerve centers for communication networks. This also applies to the Middle Ages and the early modern period. Between Late Antiquity and early modernity, libraries did not change only in terms of their content. Their organization and function likewise changed dramatically. With the introduction of the printing press, furthermore, they had to confront a revolution in media. Led by internationally recognized specialists, the SCRIPTO conference at Erlangen will trace the development of library science from the Carolingians to the humanists and pay particular attention to the actors involved and their networks. The conference does not aim at completeness, but proposes to present various, important types of libraries from the eighth to the sixteenth century in their making.

The conference begins on the evening of 5 December with a guest lecture and a presentation of early medieval manuscripts in the original. On Thursday, 6 December, established experts will give introductions to the libraries of the mendicant orders (Luciano Cinelli), court libraries (Vanina Kopp), Cistercian libraries (Thomas Falmagne, Michele C. Ferrari), as well as the libraries of the humanists and intellectual elite of the early modern period (Nikolaus Henkel, Outi Merisalo). From the holdings of the University Library at Erlangen, select manuscripts from the Cistercian monastery of Heilsbronn (Franconia) will be shown in their original.

On Friday, 7 December, SCRIPTO participants will have two special sessions. In Neustadt an der Aisch Prof. Dr. Michele C. Ferrari will present medieval and early modern parish libraries, before the group visits the local, late medieval library at the Church of St. Johannes in situ. The group will then proceed to the Staatsbibliothek Bamberg (Bettina Wagner), where they will consider not only the library preserved there of the Augustinian canons from Neunkirchen am Brand (Susanne Rischpler), but also the Bamberger Stiftsbibliothek (Stefan Knoch), founded in 1007 by Emperor Henry II. Select masterworks of scribal and book art will be shown in the original.

Those applicants accepted for the course will be charged €145 (Please note that accommodation is not included). Further information (including the application form) may be obtained online:

www.scripto.mittellatein.phil.fau.de

Please submit your applications before 1st October 2018.